Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com
Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Sharp and detailed images will guide you through the disassembly and reassembly of the Ruger 10/22 trigger group. Use this as a reference to aid you with trigger jobs and/or installing custom parts…

Before you start, make sure that your gun is unloaded and all ammo is removed from the work area. Then, field strip your rifle as shown in these instructions.

The Tools Required:

  1. A small punch (around 3/32″) to remove the cross-pins
  2. A pair of needle-nose pliers to hold small parts
  3. If available, a small padded vise to hold the trigger housing
Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com
Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

____________________________________________________________________

DISASSEMBLY PROCEDURE

Step 1: Remove the hammer main spring…

With the safety off, hold the top of the hammer with your thumb while you pull the trigger to release the hammer and swing it forward. Caution: Hammer spring under tension. Hold hammer firmly to avoid injury.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Pull the top of the strut to remove the hammer main spring. (Below)

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

If you wish to remove the spring from the strut, compress the spring with your fingers while you slide the retainer clip off in the direction shown (below). Caution: Don’t let the parts fly away.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 2: Remove the ejector…

Use your punch to push out the cross-pin. Caution: Spring under tension.

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Remove the ejector from the trigger housing…

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 3: Remove the hammer assembly…

Use your punch to push out the hammer cross-pin.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com
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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Remove the hammer assembly from the trigger housing.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 4: Remove the bolt stop/release…

Use your punch to push out the cross-pin.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com
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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Pull the plate up and to the rear of the housing to remove.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 5: Remove the trigger/sear assembly…

Use your punch to remove the cross-pin.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com
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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

… then pull the trigger/sear assembly up and out of the trigger housing.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 6: Remove the trigger return plunger/spring…

Pull the plunger straight out of the hole in the back of the trigger guard and replace the spring if necessary.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 7: Remove the magazine catch/release…

Use your index finger to depress the magazine retainer piston while you pull the mag release lever out of the bottom of the housing. You may need to wiggle the mag release a little to get it out.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com
Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com
Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com


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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Great work! You have successfully stripped down the fire control group to a bare trigger housing.

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ASSEMBLY PROCEDURE

Before you begin assembly, make sure you clean and lightly oil all of the parts in the fire control group. Do not leave excess oil on the parts, as it will only serve to attract excess dirt. Replace any of the unwanted or worn parts with new or custom parts and follow the steps below.

Step 1: Install the magazine catch/release…

Insert the retaining piston and spring into the hole on the front face of the trigger housing.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Use your index finger to depress the piston while you insert the magazine release lever from the bottom of the trigger housing.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Make sure the top portion of the mag release lever is in the correct position in the rear of the piston (below).

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Test the function by pressing upwards on the mag release lever. It should depress the piston (below)…

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 2: Install the trigger return plunger/spring…

For steps 2 and 3 it helps to clamp the trigger housing vertically so that gravity keeps the trigger return plunger/spring in place.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 3: Install the trigger/sear assembly…

First, piece together the trigger and sear using the cross-pin to hold it all in place. Make sure the spring is in the proper position in its retaining holes.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com
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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Carefully remove the cross-pin from the trigger/sear assembly, but don’t let it fall apart (above). Carefully insert the trigger/sear into the top of the trigger housing (below; double arrows) and align it with the correct cross-pin hole (below; single arrow). Insert the cross-pin.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Once it is installed, it should look like this (below)…

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 4: Install the bolt stop/release…

Place the bolt stop/release plate into the trigger housing from the top. Make sure the plate is flat against the shooters left side of the housing, and ease it into position so the bottom portion comes through in front of the trigger guard.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Align the cross-pin hole in the bolt stop/release plate with the hole in the trigger housing and insert the cross pin.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Make sure the top, flat part of the bolt stop/release plate aligns with the top of the trigger housing (below).

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 5: Install the hammer assembly…

Place the metal bushings into the hammer axis hole, and place the spring in the correct position on the shooters right side of the hammer (below).

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com
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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Install the hammer assembly into the top of the trigger housing by lifting the rear of the bolt stop/release plate and sliding the hammer bushing under it (below). Align the cross-pin hole on the trigger housing with the hammer axis hole and insert the cross-pin.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Make sure the lower arm of the spring is correctly positioned inside the notch on the bolt stop/release plate (below).

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 6: Install the ejector…

Place the ejector into the notch on the top/front of the trigger housing.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Align the ejector’s axis hole with the cross-pin hole and insert the cross-pin.

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As you insert the cross-pin, compress the top arm of the spring so that it goes under the cross-pin (below).

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Step 7: Install the hammer main spring and strut assembly…

With the safety off, pull the trigger and manually push the hammer into the forward position.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Insert the hammer main spring assembly into the retaining hole in the lower rear of the trigger housing.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Align the top of the strut with the groove on the back of the hammer.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Use your thumb to retract the hammer back into the cocked position, and engage the safety.

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Copyright 2010 Brasstard.com

Congratulations! You have completed the fire control group assembly procedure. You may now reinsert it into the receiver. Have fun and stay safe out there with your Ruger 10/22.

The Brasstard

Ruger 10/22 Trigger Group Disassembly/Reassembly – Detailed Tutorial & Images

47 thoughts on “Ruger 10/22 Trigger Group Disassembly/Reassembly – Detailed Tutorial & Images

  • August 30, 2017 at 12:47
    Permalink

    Great post… saved me a LOT of time! Thank you!

    Reply
  • August 9, 2014 at 10:51
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    Brothers, when changing the Hammer Spring it is best to use a Vice and a extra pair of hands – ask your Wife to help. I took a pair of large scissors and separated the two parts , took one and Modified it by cutting out a notch- actually a “U” . I use this tool to pull down the Spring while the part is in a Vice and My Wife slid out the Top Tab. Then replaced the Spring pressed it down and My Wife slide the top tab back on. Bingo! Took less that 3 minutes. I have used this Tool to replace hammer Springs and Bolt Spring in Many Rifles and Shotguns. Yes I learned the Hard Way First with springs flying off into outer space and All. The Notch or “U” should be thin
    But not too thin, just enough to get between the Spring at the Top.

    Reply
  • August 9, 2014 at 10:36
    Permalink

    Thank You. It’s 2nd to None instructions on the Trigger Housing of the 10/22 on the information Hwy period. I’m a trained hobby Gun Smith and could have Figured it all out wasting Time, but with your step by step instructions It became a breeze. Now I’m a 10/22 know it all ha ha. Much thanks. Keep it up Brother and GOD Bless You.

    Reply
  • May 11, 2014 at 19:58
    Permalink

    Excellent tutorial. There is one thing I would like to recommend though in reassembling the trigger/sear assembly. When I have pinned parts that need to fit into another assembly or frame, I often will cut a Q-Tip rod (paper or plastic, makes no difference) just long enough to hold the parts together.

    Then, when the internal assembly is inserted into the trigger housing, it doesn’t fall apart (the temporary “pin” is held in place by the housing). Once the trigger/sear assembly is positioned properly I can insert the actual metal pin, forcing the stub of Q-Tip out at the same time. I have used this “sacrificial” pin technique many times, in assembling both my 10/22 and my Colt Gold Cup Match .45 ACP pistol.

    Reply
  • July 13, 2013 at 03:36
    Permalink

    First of all; THANK YOU!!! I purchased a complete Volquartsen trigger group upgrade kit; hammer, sear, trigger, buffer, extractor…the full meal deal; a couple hundred bucks worth. Being a complete Virgin at attempting anything like this with a firearm, I was fully prepared to drop another $100.+ to have a local gunsmith do the work of installing it.
    I came across your tutorial completely by accident. I read through it a couple of times, looked at my SR22 a couple of times, and decided I could do this myself. Not only COULD I do it myself, I DID IT MYSELF! This tutorial is light-years ahead of anything on the Ruger site, or any other site for that matter. Without it, I guarantee that a gunsmith would have made some pocket change doing it for me. Now, after having just gotten back from the range with the gun for the first time, it was an awesome feeling to fire the first round and have everything work like it was supposed to! Thank you again!

    Reply
  • July 9, 2013 at 14:21
    Permalink

    I have an older carbine model with a metal trigger housing. The trigger broke via an improper gunlock. Ordered an aftermarket trigger but having a dickens of a time reassembling. The hammer is stuck on the sear and will only position forwards or backwards…ie not clear the sear or at least do a catch and release after the trigger pull. I have watched many videos on line and am cramping up with only two hands to do this. What suggestions do you have? I am told Ruger changed the hammer after they went plastic on the housing but I am using all original parts except for the new trigger.

    Reply
  • July 7, 2013 at 14:49
    Permalink

    Wish I’d read the hint about the welding rod or 14 gauge wire in the trigger/seer trick first… tried for an hour, and then ‘lost’ the spring. Have no doubt when my new spring arrives, I’ll be able to get it back together.

    Reply
  • July 5, 2013 at 20:10
    Permalink

    Great site. When I first took my 1022 apart to clean, no one told me all the pins would fall out and drop their respective pieces all over the floor. I didn’t even get a chance to see where most of them came from or how they fit together. When I found you site, it was a God send… Had no trouble getting everything back together again. And it all worked! Pretty good for a non techie…… Thanks again.

    Reply
  • May 30, 2013 at 20:02
    Permalink

    While cleaning my 10-22 after atrip to the range I noticed how cruddy the trigger assembly had become.Looking at it I thought I can do this.I got it apart alright,but after an hour of reassembly attempts through my hands up. Ruger genetally has been a good resource for tricky stuff, but their csr was no help this time. Found your website through google and thank you thank you thank you!!.Your tutorial was so clear,easy to understand and properly detailed ,after just reading it through just once I had my trigger guard reassemled in minutes.A ruly awesome tutorial!

    Reply
  • May 10, 2013 at 20:49
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    Excellent views with great instructions!

    Reply
  • May 10, 2013 at 20:47
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    Excellent views,great instructions.I have a ruger SR-22 rifle. I have not taken a part yet (will be cleaning this week fired 75-100 rounds at range this week for the first time.One question, will the SR-22 have same bolt/trigger assemblies as the 10/22?? Thanks

    Reply
  • December 21, 2012 at 15:36
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    Bought a 10/22 from my brother that he had disassembled 15 years ago as a project gun. He had the hammer spring on the wrong side, after 15 years of parts sitting in a bag that will happen. Thanks to this excellent site I saved a trip to the gunsmith, learned the workings of my rifle, and was able to put it back in service. Thank you.

    Reply
  • August 10, 2012 at 14:38
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    Great site with good information. Thanks

    Reply
  • July 4, 2012 at 15:51
    Permalink

    Great job on your thorough, easy to follow and straight forward instructions.
    You could not find a book that is more comprehensive. I have one question. Is the ejector supposed to be tight fitting and and not move in its slot in the trigger group? It makes sense that it would be stationary and may be a stupid question but I want to make sure I cover all my bases for my complete rebuild. Thanks again for the excellent guide!

    REPLY-ADMIN:

    Rich,
    Thanks for the feedback. Contrary to our greater intuitions, the ejector is not stationary. It is held in place only by a single cross-pin and gravity.
    Best Regards,
    B

    Reply
  • June 22, 2012 at 17:22
    Permalink

    Excellent page!! Clear pictures, easy to follow instructions, Thank you for the time and effort you put in to this page. It made installing my trigger/sear kit a breeze and took me less than 30 minutes start to finish. Consider yourself added to my bookmarks!

    Reply
  • June 19, 2012 at 16:44
    Permalink

    Thank you! Clear reassembly instructions, easy to follow and worked well for me. I was especially pleased given that the whole trigger group basically fell apart after I took it out to clean the rifle; that problem was loose-fitting pins in the new plastic trigger assembly.

    I applaud you, thanks again.

    Reply
  • April 5, 2012 at 19:23
    Permalink

    Very helpful and infinitely better than the cryptic “instructions” which accompanied some aftermarket parts. Thanks much!

    The only suggestion I would make is to use a shortened “slave” pin to hold the trigger/sear assembly together while inserting it into the housing. Insertion of the actual pin gradually displaces the slave pin & keeps everything together, since it is VERY easy for the assembly to fall apart during installation.

    Reply
  • February 29, 2012 at 12:35
    Permalink

    Very detailed & informative. Any chance of something similar, showing what & where to check for wear?

    Reply from Admin:
    Hi GC,
    A good rule of thumb is to always inspect all contact surfaces for excess wear when you clean the gun. However, you would be hard pressed to wear out a 10/22. I have a couple of them… one is 30 years old and the other is 26-ish. Both are heavily used and have tens of thousands of rounds through them. Beyond the recoil springs, neither gun has ever had a single part wear out.
    Best Regards, B

    Reply
  • February 3, 2012 at 23:23
    Permalink

    That really is a great description of both take down and assembly. I used it to fill in for some much less complete instructions from a trigger kit manufacturer. Thanks for taking the time to put this up.

    Reply
  • January 29, 2012 at 22:56
    Permalink

    How does the safety work? I took mine apart to clean and did something to the safety. Help

    Reply

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